A look at raskolnikov mathematical evaluation of the moral dilemma

Therefore, Raskolnikov may cause a high degree of pain with no resulting pleasure to show for it. In conclusion, utilitarianism is the most democratic of moral theories. We would have mobs of people murdering their rich, old landladies because they would feel that they are justified, if only they donate some of the money to charity.

Therefore, he commits an immoral act, while feeling justified because he the utilitarian theory protects him. However, Raskolnikov, in his subjectivity of the situation, has not considered the likeliness of several possibilities. This is because the theory of value cannot measure the value of an intangible quality such as life.

In measuring the level of pleasure and pain associated with each outcome, a utilitarian must base his evaluation on the probabilities of all likely consequences. He could find alternative ways to raise money fundraising, donations, etc. According to Raskolnikov, he has two available options: The theory of right action does not stand alone as the only condition for ethical evaluations.

She would not be so hasty to overlook her personal pain, although it is outweighed by the positive consequences of her murder.

They would also assert that because utilitarianism values only those things which promote pleasure, it does not value human life. So, who provides the standards to make sure that people do not feel justified in committing murder?

Even if Raskolnikov could prove to the old woman that her death is the morally right decision according to utilitarianism, I doubt that she would go along with the plan. These two principles work together and serve as criteria for whether or not a utilitarian can deem an action morally right.

Whereas the theory of right action deems an act morally right if it is the best choice out of all available options, Raskolnikov simplifies the situation and ignores other available options.

Even if Raskolnikov could prove to the old woman that her death is the morally right decision according to utilitarianism, I doubt that she would go along with the plan.

Raskolnikov arbitrarily leaves out some necessary considerations in his moral "equation" that do not adhere to utilitarianism. Raskolnikov seems to be employing utilitarianism when he justifies the murder of his landlady. The theory of value bases itself on the premise that pleasure is the only thing valuable in itself and as an end.

However, a non-utilitarian would contend that the human life of an individual should be valued more than any other consideration, especially one as superficial as money, because once it is taken away, it is irrevocable. Therefore, utilitarianism not concerned with just the short-term consequences of the decision nor with the sole effects on the agent himself.

He could find alternative ways to raise money fundraising, donations, etc. Raskolnikov might be caught in the act. A non-utilitarian would argue that one cannot simply dismiss the factor of pain, even if overshadowed by a greater amount of pleasure. This is because the theory of value cannot measure the value of an intangible quality such as life.

To a non-utilitarian a human life holds a tremendous amount of value, a value that cannot be quantified into simplistic factors and then dismissed. Philosophy term papers Disclaimer: So while utilitarian would describe his formula as "the greatest good for the greatest number", a non-utilitarian would characterize it as "the happiness of many overshadowing the happiness of the individual".

To a non-utilitarian a human life holds a tremendous amount of value, a value that cannot be quantified into simplistic factors and then dismissed. However, a non-utilitarian would contend that the human life of an individual should be valued more than any other consideration, especially one as superficial as money, because once it is taken away, it is irrevocable.

To measure the given alternatives, I would have to apply the theory of value. Both alternatives would produce a greater amount of net pleasure than the single, drastic option Raskolnikov has considered. In reality, his reasoning leaves out several elements such as numerous alternatives and unforseeable consequences, which true utilitarian arguments do not take for granted.A Look at Raskolnikov Mathematical Evaluation of the Moral Dilemma PAGES 6.

WORDS 1, View Full Essay. More essays like this: raskolnikov, mathematical evaluation, moral dilemma. Not sure what I'd do without @Kibin - Alfredo Alvarez, student @ Miami University.

raskolnikov, mathematical evaluation, moral dilemma. Not sure what I'd. -Raskolnikov Raskolnikov's mathematical evaluation of the moral dilemma presented to him in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment exemplifies the empirical view of utilitarianism. Utilitarianism attempts to distinguish between right and wrong, research paper.

Utilitarianism in Crime and Punishment Raskolnikov's mathematical evaluation of the moral dilemma presented to him in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment exemplifies the empirical view of utilitarianism.

- Utilitarianism in Crime and Punishment Raskolnikov's mathematical evaluation of the moral dilemma presented to him in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment exemplifies the empirical view of utilitarianism. The free Philosophy research paper (Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment: Raskolnikov's Mathematical Evaluation of Moral Dilemma Presented To Him Exemplifies The Empirical View of Utilitarianism essay) presented on this page should not be viewed as a sample of our on-line writing service.

Raskolnikov's mathematical evaluation of the moral dilemma presented to him in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment exemplifies the empirical view of utilitarianism.

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A look at raskolnikov mathematical evaluation of the moral dilemma
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